Direniş Kültürleri Belgeselleri Gösterimi

Documentary Screenings organized by Creative Çukurcuma & Cultures of Resistance

Date & Time – 22nd of February, Monday
6 pm – Life is Waiting
Referendum and Resistance in Western Sahara
8 pm – K2 and the Invisible Footmen
Location – BLOK art space

Cultures Of Resistance:

Cultures of Resistance as a project is to create and distribute films that advance public awareness about issues of social and economic justice, and that showcase creative efforts to promote peace and protect human rights. Pera Film is showcasing two documentaries directed by Iara Lee: K2 and the Invisible Footmen and Life is Waiting: Referendum and Resistance in Western Sahara. Iara Lee, a Brazilian of Korean descent is an activist, filmmaker, and director of the Cultures of Resistance Network. In 2010, she released a feature-length documentary entitled Cultures of Resistance, which explores how creative action contributes to conflict prevention and resolution. As an extension of her commitment to the issues explored in the film, she also founded the Cultures of Resistance Network, an organization that promotes global solidarity, supports efforts to secure peace and social justice, and brings together artists and change-makers from around the world.

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Life is Waiting
Referendum and Resistance in Western Sahara

Director: Iara Lee
Western Sahara/United States/Spain, 2015, 59’, color
English with Turkish subtitles

Forty years after its people were promised freedom by departing Spanish rulers, the Western Sahara remains Africa’s last colony. While a UN-brokered ceasefire put an end to armed hostilities in the territory in 1991, the Sahrawi people have continued to live under the Moroccan armed forces’ oppressive occupation, and what peace exists in the area is fragile at best. Tens of thousands of Sahrawis have fled to neighboring Algeria, where over 125,000 refugees still live in camps that were intended to be temporary. In spite of these difficulties, a new movement, with youth at its center, is rising to challenge human rights abuses and to demand the long-promised referendum on freedom. Today’s young generation is deploying creative nonviolent resistance for the cause of self-determination. In doing so, they’ve had to persevere against a torrent of conflicting forces. While risking torture and disappearance at the hands of Moroccan authorities, they’re also pushing back against those who have lost patience with the international community and are ready to launch another guerrilla war. This film examines these tensions as it chronicles the everyday violence of life under occupation, giving voice to the aspirations of a desert people for whom colonialism has never ended.

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K2 and the Invisible Footmen

Director: Iara Lee
Pakistan/United States/Brazil, 2015, 55’, color
English with Turkish subtitles

Located on the border between Pakistan and China, K2 is the second-highest mountain on Earth. For many climbers, it is an even greater prize than Everest, with limited routes, a steeper ascent, and a harder push to its summit. Nicknamed the ‘Savage Mountain,’ K2’s peak juts unprotected into the atmosphere, regularly exposing climbers and porters to life-threatening weather conditions. Despite being paid at rates far below those received by international expedition leaders, such porters—whether they provide critical supplies to expedition base camps or take on higher-altitude tasks in support of ascending climbers—do some of the most difficult and dangerous work and these efforts make them worthy of recognition as the true heroes of mountaineering. In K2 and the Invisible Footmen, filmmaker Iara Lee and team chronicle the lives of both Pakistani porters and Nepalese sherpas. The film also follows the first official all-Pakistani climbing team, made up of former porters, who successfully summited in 2014, in celebration of K2 60th anniversary. Amid breathtaking scenery, the film depicts the everyday sacrifices of porters and the courage of those indigenous climbers who choose to return to scale K2 in spite of past tragedies. In their striving to perfect their craft, these mountaineers provide a fresh look into the cultures and national traditions of Pakistan, a country typically portrayed in the foreign media as merely a land of conflict and sectarian strife.